I'm confident and comfortable in confronting every type of marine legal and technical issue
out there. I've owned three boats in the last 35 years. I have watchstanding experience in
engine rooms and steam turbine power plants in the years before becoming an attorney.
As a marine engineer, I know my way around ships and their propulsion machinery.

My initial consultations are free and confidential. With injury cases, there is no up-front
fee...they are handled on a contingency basis. This means I only receive a fee if I am
successful in the case. This applies to motor vehicle and hospital error cases as well.

I also handle alternate dispute resolution techniques if the situation is appropriate and the
parties are willing. Cost effective alternatives to litigation, such as arbitration or mediation
can sometimes be a more suitable choice. It all depends on the particular matter and how
motivated the parties are to put the dispute behind them. There may also be situations in
which arbitration is the only available forum, as in the case of parties agreeing beforehand
to arbitration instead of litigation.

Whatever the situation, your initial call and consult with me is free and confidential.


Tim Akpinar Contact Information:

Telephone:        
e-mail:              

Street
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© February 2005 by Tim Akpinar - All Rights Reserved
The contents of this website may not be copied or transmitted without the prior
written consent of Tim Akpinar
(718) 224-9824
t.akpinar@verizon.net

250-02 Northern Blvd - Suite 200
Little Neck, New York 11363

P.O. Box 620766
Little Neck, New York 11362

www.mycounsel.us
Jones Act Plaintiffs - Marine Litigation - Marine Arbitration - Marine Claims - Admiralty Jurisdiction - Maritime Law
All litigation, whether maritime or general in
nature, is formalized by issues involving subject
matter jurisdiction, codes of civil procedure,
rules of evidence, rules of conflicts, and other
factors. While most litigation attorneys possess
the skills necessary to prosecute a matter from
start to finish, not all attorneys feel comfortable
litigating all types of cases. After all, litigation is
a broad area and can cover lawsuits ranging
from trademark infringement over a famous
company's logo to breach of contract over a
movie star's performance in an epic
blockbuster. While litigation can be described as
a fairly standardized skill or art, attorneys
operate better in areas in which they understand
the subject matter. To see a brief discussion of
some of the legal issues that arise in a boating
accident, go to
Boating Accident Legal Issues.

As a merchant marine officer and recreational
boater, I appreciate the technical and practical
aspects of a maritime lawsuit. It can involve a
Jones Act injury on the deck of a brown water
towboat or deep sea fishing trawler. It can
involve a warranty dispute for a pair of
outboards on a canyon running sportfisherman.
It can involve a collision between a jet ski and a
kayak or canoe. It can involve a marine salvage
dispute...where the vessel owner claims it was a
tow and the rescuer claims it was salvage.
maritime attorney Tim Akpinar.
Professor Calamari teaches
Admiralty and Maritime Law at St.
John’s University School of Law,
before which he served as
counsel for the U.S. Military Sealift
Command and maritime attorney
at the law firm Alexander, Ash &
Schwartz.

Tim Akpinar visited the law school
on March 23, 2006 and spoke
before the Admiralty Law Society
about maritime law issues
covering salvage law, the law of
finds, the Jones Act and other legal
issues affecting the rights of
commercial fishermen.
Arbitration vs Litigation

Litigation can be
expensive. Expensivie for
the plaintiff. Expensive for
the defendant. Sometimes
litigation is the only way to
resolve a dispute. Both
sides may be at such an
impasse that the only
avenue is a hostile and
contentious drag out fight
in court. But sometimes,
the courthouse isn't the
best solution.

The role of a maritime
lawyer isn't just to put on a
show in court. Yes...they
should be prepared to fight
aggressively in court, if
necessary...but a good
maritime trial lawyer
should be an advocate
who seeks to bring a
client's matter to a
favorable resolution in an
efficient, expedient, and
economical manner. And
that can mean exploring
solutions outside of the
courtroom. It can mean
saving a client tens of
thousands of dollars in
expert testimony,
consultant reports,
stenographers, to name
but a few of the expenses
that can be saved with
alternate dispute
resolution.
disclaimers in general,
this office uses a simple
straightforward one that
can be seen by clicking
here